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I started a batch of beet kvass (a nourishing tonic of Ukranian origin) a few days ago and it was ready today. It turned out to be not as terrible as some kvass I bought at the health food store a few months ago, so that’s good, right?. It tastes a little salty but rich and beet-y and bracing.  We don’t have the space in our kitchen for a big kombucha production, so this is a good (and simpler) alternative for those who want a refreshing probiotic beverage to help them feel superior to other wealthy, overeducated, urban-homesteading Americans who are obsessed with esoteric, fermented, “traditional” food and drink. (Ok, I don’t really know where that uplifting sentiment came from, but it’s aimed at myself & I guess stems from a deep self-consciousness about even posting about beet kvass in the first place. Existential angst still going strong at the ripe old age of 31. Sorry, y’all).

So anyway.  To make this, all you do is roughly chop a couple of beets (skin on), and put them in a glass jar with a little salt and some whey (or extra salt) and let it sit out at room temperature for a few days before storing in the fridge.  One recipe I saw said you could let it ferment for up to 2 weeks. You can also let it sit in the fridge for several days after the fermentation, which gives it a stronger flavor.

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Health Benefits of Beet Kvass

*cleanses the liver
*alkalizes the blood
*assists digestive system
*used in cancer therapy in Europe
*boosts energy
*great source of probiotics
*plenty of B vitamins and minerals

See here for recipe.  (Here’s a recipe that doesn’t require whey.) Read here for health benefits of beets.  Next time I make it I’m going to add some pieces of fresh ginger and see if it makes it nice and gingery.  I hope so.

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